19.03.2018 09.00 UTC

A new court decision could give the Administration an opportunity to completely withdraw the regulations expanding ERISA’s definition of fiduciary and limit the ability to expand the scope of ERISA’s fiduciary protections in the future.

Court of Appeals Strikes Down Fiduciary Rule

Court of Appeals Strikes Down Fiduciary Rule

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit has issued an opinion striking down the DOL’s new fiduciary rule. The decision will add more (unwelcome) uncertainty.

On March 15 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit struck down the DOL’s new fiduciary rule. The decision, in very sweeping terms, concluded that the DOL did not have the regulatory authority to expand the previous definition of “fiduciary” contained in 1975 regulations. The breadth of the Court’s ruling, if upheld, makes it virtually impossible for the DOL to somehow modify the fiduciary proposal or to issue new fiduciary rules.

07.03.2018 06.43 UTC

ERISA requires that plan fiduciaries must evaluate the “reasonableness” of provider contracts. This goes beyond provider revenue generated directly from plan services and includes all revenue generated in connection with the plan. Fiduciaries should take note.

Selecting and Retaining Service Providers: Time to Dig Deeper?

Selecting and Retaining Service Providers: Time to Dig Deeper?

Plan fiduciaries need to respond to changing industry practices. The next challenge in protecting plans may be fees for non-plan related financial products.

There is ongoing pressure on plan providers to continue to lower fees. And, it is reasonable to expect providers to seek alternative sources of revenue that may not be part of plans’ direct costs. In monitoring providers, fiduciaries should take note of rules under ERISA that require fiduciaries to obtain information from providers about both direct and indirect compensation that will be received by providers “in connection with” the plan services. This requirement goes beyond simply negotiating plan fees and beyond the general “prudence” requirements.

25.01.2018 04.59 UTC

A new chapter may be opening in the ongoing saga of litigation against plan fiduciaries. A new target in this sage - plan vendors’ use of participant confidential financial to facilitate the cross-sales of non-plan financial products.

Fiduciary Lawsuits: A New Chapter Opening?

Fiduciary Lawsuits: A New Chapter Opening?

Latest Complaint Against NYU Raises New Challenges

Plaintiffs in the lawsuit against the NYU retirement plans have filed an amended complaint. This new complaint challenges the use, by the plans’ recordkeeper, of participant confidential financial data and the recordkeeper’s cross-selling of non-plan financial products to plan participants.

12.01.2018 02.58 UTC

Plan participants and representatives servicing your retirement plan may be “trapped” by hidden incentive programs.

Unchecked Revenue: Show Me the Fees

Unchecked Revenue: Show Me the Fees

Recordkeepers can engage in practices to mask the total revenue they obtain from plan participants. Plan sponsors need to be smarter and more aggressive in eliminating these practices.

As recordkeeping fees continue to decline, recordkeepers are becoming more resourceful. As a result, representatives servicing your retirement plan may be paid based on their ability to sell financial products to your employees. Employer beware.

16.12.2017 10.24 UTC

Under current law, financial firms can play fast and loose with significant amounts of personal financial data. Employers are a key source of financial firms access to employees’ financial information (through employer-sponsored retirement plans). So, with employers already involved in providing employees’ financial information, what can employers do to protect that data.

Twenty-One Years After HIPAA Added Protections for Health Information, What About Financial Information?

Twenty-One Years After HIPAA Added Protections for Health Information, What About Financial Information?

Employers can play an active role in protecting employees’ financial data – and, have a roadmap for doing so by looking at HIPAA.

There are few rules under current federal law to prevent financial firms from exploiting individuals’ personal financial information. Employers are a key source of financial firms access to employees’ financial information (through employer-sponsored retirement plans). So, with employers already involved in providing employees’ financial information, what can employers do to protect that data?

28.11.2017 09.31 UTC

Your employees’ financial data is vulnerable – and not just to illegal hacking – but to your retirement plan provider. These providers also have powerful financial incentives – and plenty of opportunity – to use plan participants’ data to market (unrelated) financial products to these participants.

Data Insecurity: It’s Not Just the Hack

Data Insecurity: It’s Not Just the Hack

Employers need to pay attention to how retirement plan providers use participant data – and start establishing limits on how that data can be used.

Employers focused on data security need to look beyond computer hacks as they try to keep employees’ confidential financial information secure. Retirement plan providers have access to a wealth of plan participants’ data. These providers also have powerful financial incentives – and plenty of opportunity – to use plan participants’ data to market (unrelated) financial products to these participants.

16.11.2017 08.22 UTC

Legally required reporting and disclosure materials provide employees with lots of information- but not enough insight. As a result, billions of dollars are rolled over each year into costly financial products.

Retirement Plan Disclosure: Why are Participants Adrift in a Sea of Information?

Retirement Plan Disclosure: Why are Participants Adrift in a Sea of Information?

Employers’ communication to employees about their retirement plans are designed to comply with various legal requirements.

Compliance with government required reporting and disclosure requirements gives participants lots of information – and pieces to the retirement puzzle. However, in their efforts to comply with these requirements, participants are not provided enough to assemble the disparate pieces of information available. And, there are some key pieces missing.

26.10.2017 07.33 UTC

Retirement plan assets are an attractive target for financial services firms. These firms (often including providers hired by the employer) have a wide variety of ways to steer employees to high priced products and services. And, despite efforts to help employees save and invest for retirement, employees remain vulnerable. Employers need to do more if they want to protect employees – and themselves.

Employees (Still) at Risk: Distributable Events

Employees (Still) at Risk: Distributable Events

Protecting Employers by Protecting Employees’ Accounts

Employers provide lots of information to retirement plan participants about their investment choices and distribution options. Despite these efforts, there is a significant gap in efforts to protect employee savings. The gap occurs because financial services firms make a lot of money by steering employees to higher priced investment and insurance products. New Department of Labor regulations will still leave gaps – gaps that financial firms are sure to exploit. There is more that employers can do to protect plan participants – and themselves. But it will require a new approach.